Federal Election 2016: Bill Shortens reply to the DD anouncement to call election for July 2

Bill Shorten Addressing the media in Tasmania in reply to the Prime Ministers announcement of a Federal Election on July 2

Bill Shorten closed by drawing on his emotional experience of the Beaconsfield mine collapse. He is speaking from Tasmania, where the disaster occurred 10 years ago. Mr Shorten was heavily involved in the incident at the time, in his role as National Secretary for the Australian Workers Union.

"People saw during that mine rescue glances of an Australia which I think don't always appear on the nightly news: our towns and families who work hard for the money, towns that have a lot of community spirit. I am touched by the way that they have lived their lives in the past 10 years."

Shorten continued: "I never forget that one miner died, but these two guys got rescued, and the people who rescued them, they weren't some sort of special troops or special forces, they were their fellow miners. I saw what happened then, and I commemorate the anniversary of that remarkable story.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has emphasised the working class and “everyday people” in his press conference just now.

Mr Shorten has dismissed the notion of engaging in class warfare previously, but his comments to media now highlighted his push for the “common endeavour”.

He also touched on his work as a union leader, citing his time at Beaconsfield during the rescue of miners ten years ago – he also ended by saying he was off to meet them for a beer.

To summarise, Mr Shorten emphasised:

 

Education and childcare

 

Healthcare and Medicare

Climate change and renewable energy

Gender equity

Budget repair

Bill Shorten has been asked about his tax plan for big businesses: what will he say when they want a tax cut? Shorten criticises the Coalition's redefining of what a "small business" is.

"Let us be clear, Labor absolutely supports a tax cut for businesses under $2 million. But  businesses of $10 million and $50 million and $1 billion are not small businesses."

Where was climate change in the PM's speech?

Mr Shorten has painted the Liberals as a party in disarray while Labor is in "unified" and in "lockstep".

"Mr Turnbull's problem is that eight months ago, many people hoped that he could change the Liberal Party. I frankly think it is amazing that in Mr Turnbull's pitch to be re-elected, he did not even mention climate change. He famously said that he did not want to lead a party that was not interested in climate change. Now 

he has a brushed climate changed out of his presentation altogether."

"Mr Turnbull does not control the party,' Mr Shorten said soon afterwards.

Shorten says Australians want a debate on the issues this election.

"I believe that Australians are hungry for an election which is more than just slogans. They want to know the 

detail," he told reporters in Tasmania.

Bill Shorten rams down the message that Labor are 'trustworthy' when it comes to tax reform.

"The Australian people are not in any fashion greedy. They do not look for a handout in my experience, but I think they are very frustrated (with the proposed income and company tax cuts) ... It is not about Labor or Liberal when it comes to these fundamental issues, it is about the Australian people, and when comes to the issues, they can trust Labour. They can trust Labour because that is in our DNA."

Bill Shorten has been questioned on Malcolm Turnbull's argument that Labor is vulnerable when it comes to paying for big spending promises. Bill Shorten bites back by saying the Turnbull Government's company tax cuts will cost $50 billion over 10 years. 

"We've proposed through making multinationals pay their fair share, through changing the unsustainable tax concessions at the top end of superannuation prospectively, we've proposed through going after wasteful government expenditure ... we will do budget repair that is fair."

He continues: "We have proposed saving money to the budget bottom line, by reforming negative gearing and capital gains tax laws."

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten - who just brought up his work at Beaconsfield and the rescue of miners a decade ago - is now taking questions.
 

On tax: Mr Turnbull's pretty quick to brush over the fact that he had to be dragged kicking and screaming to confirm that he's going to spend $50 billion of budget money over the next 10 years, Australian's taxpayer money, to give big business a tax break.

On budget repair: We have proposed saving money to the budget bottom line, by reforming negative gearing and capital gains tax laws, which mean that Australians aren't having to face a choice between having hospitals and schools cut.

On debates: Anywhere, any time, happy to be in the debate... We are after the debate because I believe that Australians are hungry for an election which is more than just slogans.

Bill Shorten says "it is very important that Australians understand that my opponent's views and those of his party are a real risk to the living standards of all Australians" - ouch. 

"My opponent has openly said that he wants to give states the right to raise separate income taxes. That he thinks in a perfect world the Commonwealth taxes should not be used for government schools, just to fund private schools. For six months he's toyed with Australians with the prospect of an increase of the GST by 50% and a GST to be put on everything. And in his budget this week just past he has launched retrospective changes to the tax treatment of people's superannuation undermining confidence in the whole superannuation system. And the centrepiece of his budget this week was to reward millionaires with a $17,000 tax cut to provide $50 billion of tax breaks to Australia's largest companies."

Labor leader Bill Shorten says this election is "more than a choice between parties and personalities" and again says the Coalition are a government backing the wealthy.

"This election is much more than a choice between parties and personalities. This election is a choice about what sort of Australia that we want to live in. What sort of Australia do we want our children to grow up in? That we want our older Australians to be able to be secure in their retirement. A choice as basic as this. Will this country be a country that ensures that the fair go is for everyone? Or that the fair go is just limited to the fortunate few?"

"I will fight the election on issues vital to millions of Australians. I will fight this election on schools and education. I will fight this election for health, hospitals and Medicare. I will fight thielection for real action on climate change. I will fight this election to help create a vibrant economy, growing jobs, with reasonable conditions, and security for all. I will fight this election to make Australia a fairer place, where the needs of families, small businesses, the great bulk of Australians, are placed at the top of the priority list."

'Dithering and disappointment'

 
Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has also taken aim at the Coalition's policy, accusing Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull of "dithering".
 
Mr Shorten has highlighted the abandoned state income tax plan, as well as proposed tax reforms which he says will "reward millionaires".
 

Will this country be a country that ensures that the fair go is for everyone? Or that the fair go is just limited to the fortunate few? 

'Dithering and disappointment'

 
Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has also taken aim at the Coalition's policy, accusing Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull of "dithering".
 
Mr Shorten has highlighted the abandoned state income tax plan, as well as proposed tax reforms which he says will "reward millionaires".
 
 
 

Will this country be a country that ensures that the fair go is for everyone? Or that the fair go is just limited to the fortunate few? 

 

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